The Lastingness and Beauty of Their Love

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Newlyweds, tintype, circa 1871. Ann Longmore-Etheridge Collection.

“I’ve felt for the first time in my life the joyful consciousness that I am truly loved by a truly good man, one that with all my heart I can love and honor… one who loves me for myself alone, and with an unselfish, patient, gentle affection such as I never thought to waken in a human heart… a man in whom I can trust without fear, in whose principles I have perfect faith, in whose large, warm, loving heart my own restless soul can find repose.”—Anna Alcott Pratt, 1859

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Newlyweds, 1/6th-plate relievo ambrotype, circa 1858. Ann Longmore-Etheridge Collection.

“[M]y love for you is deathless, it seems to bind me to you with mighty cables that nothing but Omnipotence could break… ”—Sullivan Ballou, letter to wife Sarah, 14 July, 1861.

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Newlyweds, English albumen cabinet card by Wakefield, 1 High Street, Ealing, circa 1900. Photo courtesy James Morley.

“To lovers, I devise their imaginary world, with whatever they may need, as the stars of the sky, the red, red roses by the wall, the snow of the hawthorn, the sweet strains of music, and aught else they may desire to figure to each other the lastingness and beauty of their love.”—Williston Fish, A Last Will, 1898

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I am delighted to announce that I have joined the staff writing team at Historical Diaries. Material from Your Dying Charlotte will appear there regularly.

I am also delighted to note that I will be able to bring you material from James Morley, who maintains his vast and wonderful collection on flickr, here, and is the founder of the blog What’s That Picture? His twitter handle is @PhotosOfThePast.

Author: Ann Longmore-Etheridge

Writer, journalist, editor, historian.

4 thoughts on “The Lastingness and Beauty of Their Love”

  1. I love these photos of couples, especially the last one of the late Victorian- early Edwardian era couple! Also, I will have to see if the James Morley you reference in your article as sharing his collection with you for this article is a distant relation of mine (or related through marriage) as I have a James Brown Morley who was a brother to one of my direct ancestors on my paternal grandfather’s side, Elizabeth Morley (he lived in Rheatown, Greene County, TN after the Civil War and I believe until his death. He was a respected doctor of the town). Elizabeth Morley, his sister, was my 2nd great-grandmother, mother of my great-grandmother, Martha “Mattie” V. White (Her father, Isaac White, had died shortly after she was born in 1858) who married William A. Bennett, my great-grandfather.

    Liked by 1 person

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